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2000 Celica GT - Multiple Ignition Module Failures


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#1 HughJ

 
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Posted 16 April 2012 - 08:49 AM

I have had all four coil on plug ignition modules fail over the last 2 years. One coil failed twice in that time. Car was bought 2+ years ago with 86k miles on it, now has 110k. Coil failure evidenced by erratic engine performance and cylinder misfire code. Misfire code follows coil if switched to another cylinder. Once coil is replaced, engine runs flawlessly until next failure. Failures are random occurring 3-6 months apart. Last failure was 4 weeks since previous one. The connection between modules and plugs are clean (no oil fouling) and tight. I checked wiring continuity between ECU and module finding no problems. I checked coil ground on all modules and, just for good measure, cleaned ground connections to engine block. Changed spark plugs to OEM recommended type. Still had failures after this. The only component common to all coils that I cannot troubleshoot is the ECU. Can a bad ECU cause this intermittent problem or is there something else I'm missing?

#2 fullsizeblazin

 
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Posted 16 April 2012 - 12:41 PM

I have had all four coil on plug ignition modules fail over the last 2 years. One coil failed twice in that time. Car was bought 2+ years ago with 86k miles on it, now has 110k.
Coil failure evidenced by erratic engine performance and cylinder misfire code. Misfire code follows coil if switched to another cylinder. Once coil is replaced, engine runs flawlessly until next failure. Failures are random occurring 3-6 months apart. Last failure was 4 weeks since previous one.
The connection between modules and plugs are clean (no oil fouling) and tight. I checked wiring continuity between ECU and module finding no problems. I checked coil ground on all modules and, just for good measure, cleaned ground connections to engine block. Changed spark plugs to OEM recommended type. Still had failures after this.
The only component common to all coils that I cannot troubleshoot is the ECU. Can a bad ECU cause this intermittent problem or is there something else I'm missing?


Are you replacing with OEM coils or aftermarket?

Try voltage drop tests?

#3 Saltmine

 
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Posted 16 April 2012 - 03:41 PM

Japs are real bad about grounding electrical components. I still remember a friend who had his <gasp!> Honda scarf down three computers, at $1700 apiece, before his smart-assed Honda Technician discovered the alternator wasn't securely bolted down. No harm no foul....except it cost him $5100 to get his $500 Honda fixed.
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#4 fullsizeblazin

 
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Posted 16 April 2012 - 11:07 PM

Japs are real bad about grounding electrical components. I still remember a friend who had his <gasp!> Honda scarf down three computers, at $1700 apiece, before his smart-assed Honda Technician discovered the alternator wasn't securely bolted down. No harm no foul....except it cost him $5100 to get his $500 Honda fixed.


That story isn't true. Jap cars don't break/wear out remember? Duh!

#5 Saltmine

 
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Posted 17 April 2012 - 04:40 PM

Well, Fullsizeblazin, I heard it from some reliable sources....The Easter Bunny, Santa Claus, the tooth fairy, and a rich mechanic....Jap cars do break down.....most of the time in a spectacular or expensive way.
Sam Will
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#6 Karrpilot

 
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Posted 17 April 2012 - 06:08 PM

Which is why i have never bought one of them. When you shop and compare part prices, Forget it. Jap scrap crap is usually more expensive part for part.

No longer working at dealerships. Government employee. Now i get paid to fix Fords.
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#7 fullsizeblazin

 
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Posted 17 April 2012 - 06:10 PM

Which is why i have never bought one of them. When you shop and compare part prices, Forget it. Jap scrap crap is usually more expensive part for part.


Not necessarily true for Honda's... But compared to a GM, Way expensive and no parts availability.

Jap crap needs to be scrapped.

#8 Saltmine

 
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Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:07 PM

Jap crap is Scrap crap.
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#9 fullsizeblazin

 
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Posted 17 April 2012 - 10:22 PM

So if jap crap is scrap crap, that means the scrap crap is scrap crap,of scrap crap, of scrap crap to make crap scrap? I think they use old Coor's/coke cans too.

#10 HughJ

 
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Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:07 PM

I replaced the first 2 with Rock Auto $40 modules. Replaced the next 3 with Advance Auto $120 modules. I have not tried voltage drop tests. As I mentioned, I checked wiring continuity and inspected for wiring damage. I feel wiring is not the issue because each module is individually wired and a module has now failed at each cylinder location.

#11 Valvetronic

 
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Posted 18 April 2012 - 03:06 PM

Spend the extra coin on an OEM coil and see if that fixes it. Toyota techs tell me they're fussy about not having genuine parts installed. Try searching online to see if you can get genuine Toyota parts cheaper than the local dealer.


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